Family & Alumni Weekend: The 125th Anniversary

Library Open House: the 125th year of IC

Library Open House:  Collaboration in Action

 Room 319, Gannett Center
 Saturday, November 4th, 2-3 pm

Experience the library's innovative collaboration classroom, which promotes active learning and  instruction with multiple display screens, wall-mounted cameras, an interactive whiteboard, collaboration pods, and portable whiteboards.


WELCOME TO THE ITHACA COLLEGE LIBRARY!
       Let us know of your interests such as:

  • Librarians, teaching, and information literacy
  • Library services in the 21st century
  • Archives and College History -- & Rod Serling
  • Library collections:  print and digital
  • Ask any questions about library services

Ithaca College History: Our Archives

Bridget Bower is the College Archivist.  You can find an overview on the Archives page of the library's website.  Bridget, as part of a planning committee, provided many of the historical photos and images used for the 125th event.

Featured Collections

Benjamin Alexander: IC Stories project

In 2011, Benjamin Alexander produced a series of videos called IC Then and Now that compares various buildings on campus from when they first were built and used until 2011.  Even from 2011 until today, many of our campus buildings have changed.   You can access the series through Digital Commons @ IC.  They are both enjoyable and infomative. Enjoy!

Flexible &Diverse Services & Resources

Our mission is to enhance teaching and learning at Ithaca College through the provision of flexible, diverse, and user-centered information services and resources.  Read more About the Library.

LIBRARY’S WEBSITE:
  • Ask a Librarian  is our reference service page. Students can contact us via email, phone, or text message us.
  • Talkback is where you can ask a question or make a suggestion about library services.       
  • Facebook  Students can receive alerts about jobs and other library news.
  • Twitter  This account is linked to the library news posted to facebook.
  • Vimeo There are a variety of informational videos about the library, how to research, and on campus history.
RESEARCH GUIDES:
  • Subject Guides  General guides that align with disciplines on campus.
  • Course Guides   Guides designed to fit the needs of a specific course (typically as part of a visit from a librarian).
LIBRARY BUILDING & SERVICES
  • We're open more than 148 hours per week  Extended hours during exam periods.
  • Multimedia  Our library circulates a robust collection of cinema classics, current feature films, television shows and documentaries.
  • Music   We began as a Music School and our music collection is like a special collection within the library.
  • Interlibrary Loan If we don't have an article or book, we can try and borrow them from other libraries.
  • IC Faculty, Staff, and Students have 24/7 access to online resources.
  • Library Resources for Users with Accessibility Needs  Our services strive to be inclusive.
  • Digital Media Lab.  The Digital Media Lab, a generous gift from the Class of 2011, contains four iMacs loaded with audio, video, and design software
  • Hardware and Software.  There are circulating iPads and laptops in the collection. Students can check out dry erase markers and use the white boards on the floor of the library.
  • Digital Bulletin Board   This electronic board hangs above the interior entry of the library. We're currently featuring photographs from our archives (the C. Hadley Smith collection of Ithaca College).   Take a look before you leave!

Accessing Library Collections: then and now

Watch the video shot in IC library in 1974 (above right).  How was finding information then different than it is today?

BOOKS
JOURNALS
  • Then: journals were found using paper indexes; Now: the library subscribes to numerous databases that have fulltext online access.  Here is a search on Prohibition and History with our database Academic Search Premier combined with our history database America: History and Life.  Here is what the library holds for the New Yorker magazine.  Students may find themselves looking at micro, print or online depending on the publication date.
HISTORICAL NEWS AND RESEARCH

Contact Us

picture of Bridget Bower

Bridget Bower

College Archivist
(607) 274-3096
picture of Cathy Michael

Cathy Michael

Communications Librarian
(607) 274-1293

Booked for the 20s (I.C. '74)

Teaching Information Literacy

Reference Librarians are Teachers.  Here is a Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education that exposes core ideas of our discipline; our goal is to generate an awareness of these ideas to our students: Librarians at Ithaca College developed a set of Student Learning Outcomes for first year students.  We reach out to first year students through the Ithaca Seminars.  Here is a general guide used for library instruction for the seminar courses. The classroom 319 is well designed for active learning sessions.   After the session, we ask that students provide feedback to aid in our assessment of our work.

What is Participatory Culture?

“A participatory culture is a culture with relatively low barriers to artistic expression and civic engagement, strong support for creating and sharing one’s creations, and some type of informal mentorship whereby what is known by the most experienced is passed along to novices. A participatory culture is also one in which members believe their contributions matter, and feel some degree of social connection with one another “
 Four types:
  •  Affiliations: Facebook, LinkedIn
  •  Expressions: videos, zines, mash-ups
  •  Collaborative problem solving: Wikipedia
  •  Circulations: flow of media: podcasts & blogs
Jenkins, H., & John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. (2006). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture Media Education for the 21st Century. Chicago: MacArthur Foundation.

Dr. David Lankes (Syracuse University, School of Information Studies) discusses old and new models of librarianship.   An article in the publication Information Today by Kathy Dempsey describes his advice, "So, Lankes concluded, the new promise...was participation. If librarians change their model from hoarding and safeguarding information to proactively helping citizens chase their dreams, then they’ll continue to be relevant and useful, even sought after, as the world turns."